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Category: Ca. Vaccine Exemptions

Cali. Medical Board has a new tactic to expand investigations against Vaccine Exemption-Writing Docs

Cali. Medical Board has a new tactic to expand investigations against Vaccine Exemption-Writing Docs

It’s been two years since California rescinded the personal belief vaccine exemption, so since the fall of 2016, vaccine-concerned (VC) parents of school aged kids have needed to find a physician to write vaccine medical exemptions for their children.

Right after the new law went into effect, the California Medical board filed charges against one of the most prominent VC docs, Bob Sears, for writing a court-case related letter excusing a child for all future vaccination based on the mother’s report of two serious adverse events. The non-custodial father filed the complaint. The case made many docs who wrote exemptions nervous and caused some lawyers to advise their doctor clients to stop writing exemptions. Some became more nervous when Dr. Sears agreed to a significant board sanction, (including monitoring of his practice) earlier this summer. Unfortunately, despite the sanction and monitoring, according to Dr. Sears’ facebook page, the board is investigating him for several other complaints involving exemptions. (In full disclosure, I worked on Bob’s case for awhile, but everything in this post is based on publicly available information).

While all this was happening, the medical board and other state and county health agencies were looking for information about other doctors who were writing medical exemptions. They haven’t been very successful, in part because of federal school privacy laws which restrict schools from releasing student medical information,(The law’s acronym is “FERPA”), and perhaps more importantly, because one California lawyer has made it his personal crusade to help parents protect their children’s school privacy rights. (That would be Greg Glaser, Esq.)

FERPA and Greg’s protection has made it somewhat difficult for the board to take action against other doctors, because the board needs a complaint about a specific patient to open an investigation. Normally, a complaint-based investigation is limited to the patient who is the subject of the complaint. Once there is a complaint, the Board can obtain the physician’s medical records for the patient who is the subject of the complaint, either by the consent of the parents, or via a subpoena for the records served on the doc. Many docs have refused to comply with these subpoenas, citing patient privacy and lack of patient consent. Recent court cases have ordered physicians to produce patient medical records, even over the objections of the patients/parents. That makes California like all or almost all other states, in that a medical board can obtain patient medical records for a pending board investigation, and investigations are commenced by someone filing a complaint regarding a specific patient.
The normal board practice in California and other states has been to limit the investigation to the subject of the complaint.

But apparently not any more!

The board has just served a California doctor with something called “Investigative Interrogatories” and is demanding that the physician give the name and contact information of every patient for whom the physician has written a medical exemption. This seems unprecedented in California medical board practice or case law, and arguably beyond the board’s statutory authority, but that’s what the board is doing.

Why is the board doing it? Like I said, it’s been two years since the elimination of the personal belief exemption, and the board has only disciplined one doctor, despite the fact that there are still many thousands of seemingly healthy children who are medically vaccine exempt. So maybe the board is feeling the heat from the Legislature or the state and county departments of health. And because of federal FERPA school privacy laws, the aforementioned Greg Glaser, Esq., and the fact that the board can’t investigate without a specific complaint, the board may see this new tactic as a faster and more efficient process to identify the main vaccine exemption writing docs and bring them before the board on charges on dozens (or more) cases at one hearing. Seems like this could be a big problem for the vaccine writing docs.

I’ve been tasked to stop it.

If the board doesn’t back down, we’ll end up in court, or more likely two courts (superior court and the appellate court), as the loser will surely appeal.

It’s going to be interesting.

Stay Tuned!

Rick Jaffe, Esq.
www.rickjaffe.com
rickjaffeesquire@gmail.com

And by the way, if a vaccine exemption writing doctor complies and turns over the contact information of every patient who has received an exemption, seems like a good bet that the board investigators will start calling the families of every medically vaccine exempted patient and seek their permission for their physician to release the medical records. I predict no parents will agree to do so (except perhaps post-divorce pro-vax, non-custodial parents). Absent parental consent, the medical records of these patients will be subpoenaed by the board. The doctor may resist, but ultimately the courts are likely to grant the board’s request to enforce the subpoena. After the records are reviewed by a conventional doctor, there will be a recorded interview with the physician with medical board personnel asking about the rationale for all these exemptions. A few months after the interview, a board complaint (called an Accusation in California) will be filed, charging the doctor with incompetence, gross negligence, and repeated acts of negligence in writing vaccine exemptions not in accordance with the standard of care, which means the contraindications listed on each vaccine’s label (which includes the package insert). That is essentially the opinion of the main pediatric and family medicine trade associations and the CDC. News flash: these groups basically don’t think there is any medical justification for writing a vaccine exemption for a healthy child. So a doctor facing one of these Investigative Interrogatory requests might be better off trying to stop this before it snowballs into a mega case involving dozens or hundreds of patients.

RAJ

It’s Surprisingly Quiet on the California Vaccine Front

It’s Surprisingly Quiet on the California Vaccine Front

It has now been two years since California rescinded the PBE (Personal Belief Exemption) for vaccinating school kids (SB 277). Let’s take a quick look back and see what can be learned from what has and hasn’t happened.

1. The Legal Challenges to the law were a complete bust
From the get-go, I was extremely critical of the lawsuits challenging the law. (See my earliest posts in the SB 277 section of this web site). The bottom line was/is that so long as it continues to be “accepted science” that 1. Vaccines are safe and effective and serious side effects are rare, and 2. Herd immunity is a thing, no California court will overturn the people’s will (expressed through their duly elected state legislators) to limit PBEs. No U.S.court has ever done so, and for the above two reasons, no U.S. court will ever do so, until the scientific consensus changes PERIOD

Thankfully, the vaccine-concerned have moved on from that folly, after all the challenges were rejected.

2. Here’s some good news: There haven’t been a slew of disciplinary actions against vaccine exemption writing docs (yet)

So far as I am aware, the only physician who has been disciplined for writing a vaccine exemption type letter is Dr. Bob Sears, but that was based on a case before the new vaccine law came into effect. People were afraid that all the docs writing these exemptions would be “targeted” by the board, but that hasn’t happened yet.

A perhaps interesting and important digression about how medical board cases start

Despite how it may seem to those being prosecuted, the medical board doesn’t go out and look for doctors to sanction. Medical board investigations are complaint generated and driven. The board receives information from patients, co-treating physicians, insurance companies and state agencies which either are complaints or contains information that the board determines is a violation of some law or regulation that the board enforces. (In some relatively rare cases, the board itself is the source of the information, like when a physician is on probation and thinks the doc violated a term of probation.)

Even in the vaccine context, someone has to complain to the board about a doctor writing a vaccine exemption.

Advice to California exemption writing docs: Never write an exemption for a child unless both parents request it/are on-board with it, especially if the parents are divorced.

It doesn’t matter if the sole custody parent requests it. Well, actually it does sort of matter, but if the non-custodial parent is not on-board, it is possible to very likely that the non-custodial parent will file a complaint against you, especially if there are on-going disputes between the parents. In these situations, fighting parents lash-out against a third-party like a doc. So don’t put yourself in the middle of family problems.

So who else can complain? Here’s the bad news:

County public health officials have been quietly going around the state and seeking information about which doctors are writing exemption letters and providing that information to the board. Somehow, probably illegally, they are convincing the school officials to turn over privacy protected information about students who have vaccine exemptions. It’s not a HIPAA violation once the school has the information, but it is a FERPA violation (Family Education Rights and Privacy Act). There may or may not be a private right or action for a FERPA violation, but so far, no one has taken a state or county agency to court on a FERPA privacy violation claim. (Too bad, since the case needs to be litigated.)

Based on the reporting on Dr. Bob Sears’ settlement, it appears that the board has received about 50 complaints, half of which have been dismissed or terminated, presumably without a formal board proceeding. (I haven’t heard of any exemption vaccine case having gone to a hearing yet).

Of course that means that half of the 50 board complaints are still pending. My guess is that those case involve only a handful of doctors, at most.

So what’s next on those cases?

My guess is that in the next six to nine months, the board will file accusations against a few other physicians for writing exemptions based on things like family history of autoimmune dysfunction, which I think is a popular basis for vaccine exemption.

More advice to physicians: If you’re going to use family history as a basis for an exemption, there better be very good documentation/details supporting the family history. Same, if not more so for a child’s history of prior adverse reactions. I can categorically state that it’s not enough just to record what the exemption-wanting parent says about a prior adverse reaction. Problem of course is that most adverse reactions are not worked-up because a regular pediatrician tells the parent that it will pass and advises not to come in or go to the ER.

Nonetheless, writing an exemption without at least the prior medical records which record the prior adverse event will be viewed by the board as a violation of the standard of care.

3. Indirect anti-vaccine legislation

There have been a few attempts by the pro-vaxer legislator-in-chief to pass legislation under the guise of children’s rights and other Orwellian Newspeak to abrogate the parents’ power not to vaccinate their children, but it seems like the vaccine concerned community has done a good job stopping that. But expect the attempts to continue in ever increasingly creative and indirect approaches.

The 900 Pound Gorilla

Since even before Robert Kennedy Jr. announced that he was on some to be created vaccine commission, the community has been hoping that Pres. Trump would do something about the vaccine problem, since in the past he has expressed support for the vaccine/autism connection.

Well, there’s no commission yet, and there’s not much going on in terms of presidental initiatives. But with him, you never know, and he could certainly take some game-changing action. Just don’t hold your breath.

The big unknown

I think it’s fair to say that so far, the medical board has acted deliberately, and even cautiously in dealing with the medical vaccine exemption issue. One settlement in two years, and that wasn’t even a case under the new law. Of course these cases take time, and two years from complaint to hearing is not a long time, especially if the parents don’t give permission for the release of the child’s medical records, which requires the board to go to court to get them.

So for whatever reason, we still don’t have any law or guidance about whether doctors who write exemptions for other than the labeled contraindications for each vaccine will be sanctioned by the board. What I can tell you is what you already know, namely, the standard of care for the majority of pediatricians is that there is basically never a reason to fully exempt a child from all childhood vaccination, and that following the labeled contraindications for each vaccine is the standard of care for exemption of specific vaccines, according to the speciality groups (AAP, AAFP, etc.) and the governmental agencies (CDC).

There is an argument to be made that there is another standard of care and if a doctor follows it, he/she shouldn’t be sanctioned, but my guess is that it’s going to take at least another year or two to get some board and court opinions on it.

And this just in

China is also having problems with vaccine manufacturing.

Here is a post about it which just broke today

https://www.cfr.org/blog/chinese-parents-pharma-industry-worried-sick-after-latest-vaccine-scandal

My prediction

In the next two years we’ll get some governmental legal clarification about the contours of writing exemptions, but until then, frankly, we’re all just winging it.

Rick Jaffe, Esq.
www.rickjaffe.com
rickjaffeesquire@gmail.com

Happy New Year! Last year review, and what’s coming this year/ ACCME/Cali. Vaccine /Homeopathy/Supplements/Antitrust/Obamacare

Happy New Year! Last year review, and what’s coming this year/ ACCME/Cali. Vaccine /Homeopathy/Supplements/Antitrust/Obamacare

As we start the New Year, let’s look back and forward:

CAM’s ACCME problem

The biggest challenge facing the CAM community in the coming years is that CAM organizations are under direct attack by ACCME, the main CME accrediting agency. In the last year or two, the ACCME have initiated a process to revoke several CAM organization’s CME credit provider status.

See my post:

http://rickjaffeesq.com/2017/04/04/bad-day-cam-patients-first-cam-group-caves-accmes-extortionre-education/

If ACCME succeeds, the result would be devastating to these groups because they are financially dependent on their annual conferences. CAM physicians travel to these conferences in no small part to satisfy their annual CME requirements. Removing CME accreditations would likely dramatically reduce attendance, which would put these organizations in deep financial jeopardy. The conferences are where the CAM docs learn about the latest CAM therapies, so it’s all bad, if the CAM groups lose their course accreditation status.

There are now a handful of CAM organization that are in the process of having their CME accreditation status “reviewed.” I think revocation of ACCME CME status is the intended and likely result of ACCME’s review process of these organizations. Most of these groups are keeping this problem quiet, because they understandably fear that disclosure might jeopardize membership and future conference attendance.

What there hasn’t been yet or even seriously discussed is an all-CAM response and mobilization to deal with the problem. And I think that’s a shame and short-sighted.

Reminds me of a joke: A guy jumps off a hundred story building. As he passes the 50th floor, someone asks him “How you doing.” He responds “So far, so good.”

I have to believe there is a smoking gun out there. The ACCME has seven members, one of which is CAM’s biggest institutional adversary/detractor, the Federation of State Medical Boards.

Because there are so many CAM groups that have come under review/attack in such a short period of time, I have to believe that it’s not chance; its a concerted effort, or a conspiracy if you will, to eliminate CAM organizations which will make the dissemination of CAM information much more difficult.

Hey Santa Claus, I know I’m alittle late (or early), but what I want for Christmas is that smoking gun from the Federation to the other ACCME members laying out the illegal conspiracy to revoke the ACCME certification of all CAM groups. That would be a gift that would keep on giving and I think could result in the end of the attack.

Are you listening Santa?

The California vaccine concerned folks

For better and worse, not a lot happened in California vaccine concerned world.
You didn’t need a crystal ball to predict that every lawsuits challenging SB 277 would be dismissed, and that’s exactly what happened. And the same result awaits any new lawsuits which are direct attacks on the law (which removed the personal belief exemption).

The law’s primary legislative sponsor, Dr. Richard Pan, tried some other legislative tricks to eventually force all parents to vaccinate their kids, but nothing has gotten close so far. The vaccine concerned have to remain vigilant because there’s surely more coming from this guy and his vaccine happy posse.

There’s some talk about a SB 277 repeal bill. Obviously that won’t happen next year, but there are benefits to keeping the issue alive in the California legislature. So go for it, I say.

The Biggest surprise

I had thought that 2017 would bring a spate of new board actions against Cali docs who have written medical exemptions, since according to conventional medical authorities, there’s no such thing as a valid exemption from all vaccines throughout childhood. But apart from the Bob Sears case, (and maybe one other), I haven’t seen the California Medical Board go after the many docs who are writing these exemptions. It might because the board requires a complaint from someone to initiate an investigation, and there just aren’t any complaints yet.

What’s going to happen in 2018 for the vaccine concerned?

This year we should get a ruling in Bob Sears’s case and that ruling will tell the community and its docs who are writing the exemptions whether it’s safe to continue to do so. So keep your fingers crossed and stay tuned!

The Green Pharmaceutical homeopathy case

Homeopathy is under attack in California.

See my most recent post on it:

http://rickjaffeesq.com/2017/12/12/update-green-pharmaceuticals-homeopathy-caseyou-can/

The plaintiffs did file a response to Green’s request to the California Supreme Court to review the appellate court’s decision which overturned the bench trial judge’s defense verdict. Green’s lawyers have submitted a reply, and several groups and at least one private attorney (me) filed amicus letters. We should know this month whether the Cali. Supremes will take the case. I hope they do.

Can physicians sell supplements?

Last year, I handled a case in New Mexico involving a physician’s sale of supplements. The AMA considers it unethical for physicians to sell supplements.

Who Cares? The eight or so states that incorporate the AMA ethical precepts into their standard of care laws.

New Mexico went after a physician for selling a therapeutic herbal remedy (Byron White formulas) to a patient, a practice violation based on the AMA precepts. We said it wasn’t.

I didn’t change or clarify the law, but I did get the case against the doc dismissed, (which was my job), and I had some help from star and energy powerhouse Shirley MacLaine.

See my post:

http://rickjaffeesq.com/2017/07/05/new-mexico-integ…danger-work-done/

Thanks again Shirley!

Can a CAM physician sue a medical board for antitrust violation for bringing a board case?

My view is that it’s almost impossible to win such a case.
See my post at:
http://rickjaffeesq.com/2017/04/14/want-sue-medical-board-antitrust-violations-restraining-trade-prosecuting-practicing-kind-medicine/

Nothing has happened since the post to change my mind. Every doc who has tried has had his/her case dismissed. I don’t see anything changing in the next year on that score. Are there possible benefits to bringing this kind of case and getting thrown out of court? It depends on who you ask.

Obamacare

I end with Obamacare because its demise continues to be predicted, but from the CAM business perspective, Obamacare is basically irrelevant. Let’s face it, CAM by definition is unaccepted by the mainstream which in insurance-speak means it is experimental and makes it not insurance reimbursable (at least if the therapies and procedures are properly coded). CAM practice is a cash-based business model. So I don’t see the recent or future efforts to cripple Obamacare as having a direct adverse impact on CAM practitioners. In addition, the large majority of Americans receive their health insurance through their employers or various associations, and those folks will not be directly impacted by whatever the Republicans do to further cripple Obamacare.

Indirectly however, as more people are forced out of insurance, they will either not get the care, or get the care and not pay for it. This will raise the cost of healthcare and health insurance for others. Higher costs for healthcare and healthcare insurance which will result in people having less income for discretionary, non-insurance reimbursable CAM healthcare. So as Obamacare becomes increasingly crippled, in the mid-term, there could be some financial downside experienced by CAM businesses. (I’m not going to go into the morality or efficiency of what’s going on as I’ve already addressed those issues in prior posts dealing with what’s wrong with the American healthcare system.
See my post at:
http://rickjaffeesq.com/2016/09/24/whats-wrong-u-s-healthcare-system-take-fix/

That’s about all for now. Looking forward to the New Year’s challenges.
To paraphrase George C. Scott in Patton as he overlooks the aftermath of a brutal battle: God help me, I love this stuff.

Happy New Year!

Rick Jaffe, Esq.
rickjaffeesquire@gmail.com
www.rickjaffe.com

Dr. Bob Sears Medical Board Case Update: LA Times tries to squeeze, shame and goad the California Medical Board to go after Bob Sears and other vaccine exemption writing Docs harder and faster

Dr. Bob Sears Medical Board Case Update: LA Times tries to squeeze, shame and goad the California Medical Board to go after Bob Sears and other vaccine exemption writing Docs harder and faster

We recently received hearing dates in late May, 2018 for Dr. Bob’s hearing before an administrative law judge. The case is primarily about his writing a note excusing the child from vaccination due to two prior severe vaccine reactions.

But May, 2018 apparently is not soon or severe enough for the LA Times which today published a story complaining that Dr. Bob and many other doctors are still writing medical exemptions that don’t meet the standards of medical exemptions by conventional pediatrics and the CDC (under which standards there are no medical conditions which justify a blanket exemption from all vaccines throughout childhood). The Times seems to want all these docs rounded out or put out of business today.

The title of the article says it all:

“Why hasn’t California cracked down on anti-vaccination doctors? A loophole in state law”

Here is the article:

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-vaccine-doctors-20171106-htmlstory.html

The article has some interesting quotes from Senator Ben Allen, one of SB 277’s authors about the intent of the bill and how he doesn’t support the medical board trying to intimidate doctors who write exemptions. The article also quotes Jay Gordon, another prominent vaccine concerned doc opining that it’s up to the doctor to decide whether to give an exemption or not.

Maybe the board is moving slowly because it’s starting to realize that the issue is more complicated and nuanced than the rabid pro-vaxxers make it out to be.

In working on Bob’s case for the past year, a couple things have come out that surprised me, and having been in the cutting-edge medicine field for more than 30 years, not much surprises me these days.

First, in looking for academic experts for the case, I keep hearing the same thing over and over again. The academic expert is concerned about vaccine safety but can’t go public because of fear of reprisals from the vaccine Mafioso. I find this understandable but disheartening.

Second, I keep hearing about doctors, beyond those in the vaccine concerned movement, who aren’t fully vaccinating their kids, but they are doing it quietly.

Third, there is a black hole out there when it comes to any information other than full-on negative against the vaccine concerned. Scientists not being able to get their work published. Hell, I wrote a simple update on Bob’s case and raised some issues about aluminum, and got banned from Huffington Post for doing so.

This is one of the few areas in medical science and policy where a point of view is considered too dangerous to have openly expressed in the general media apparently. I suppose I understand the reasoning behind it: fear of creating fear which could/would reduce vaccination rates. Seems wrong to me.

If there are any brave academic pediatricians willing to take a stand, get in touch.

Rick Jaffe, Esq.
Rickjaffeesquire.com
www.rickjaffe.com

Finally, Some Intelligent Action by the Cali Anti SB 277 Community!

Finally, Some Intelligent Action by the Cali Anti SB 277 Community!

I’ve been a vocal opponent of all of the anti-SB 277 constitutional lawsuits. The most recent one was a federal lawsuit filed in mid-November, 2016, in Los Angeles, and dismissed by the federal district court in January 2017. I think all of these lawsuit were (and will be if more are filed) a terrific waste of time and money. As I have repeatedly said, as long as the medical consensus is that 1. Vaccines are safe and 2. Herd immunity (from vaccines) is a thing, no court will ever overturn a mandatory vaccination law or a law eliminating a PBE (personal belief exemption) or a religious exemption.

(For my reasoning, see my posts in the SB 277 section of my web site. Here is the link.
http://rickjaffeesq.com/category/sb-277/ )

Whatever satisfactory resolution the VC (vaccine concerned) community is going to achieve, I am certain it won’t come from the judiciary, at least so long as 1. and 2 above are the “accepted” scientific facts. The constitution isn’t a suicide pact, and the few do not have the right to infect the many, and that’s what judges are thinking when you file these lawsuits because of the “accepted” science. The vaccine concerned have to figure out a more productive use of their limited time and resources.

(Hint: change the accepted science or change-out the folks who decide what’s accepted, and that’s not as far-fetched as it would have seemed prior to November 8, 2016.)

While I doubt my message got through to anyone of authority in the movement, I am happy to report that I’ve seen some signs of intelligence in the VC community, post SB 277. No answers yet, but at least there is a promising gathering of some of the folks who could possibly come-up with solutions, both on the medical/research level and on the political action level.

I’m talking about the upcoming vaccine safety conference organized by a new group called Physicians for Informed Consent (PIC). As suggested by the name, this is a group of physicians who at the very least are skeptical of the current vaccine schedule and have some safety concerns. Many of the group’s members are pediatricians who have to deal with vaccine issues every day. The conference is this Sunday, May 12, 2017 at the Costa Mesa Hilton.

Here is the Facebook link to the event. Registration technically closes Friday.
https://www.facebook.com/events/1834537363451194/

The conference has two parts. The morning session is only open to physicians and will consist of a panel discussion with some of the leading vaccine concerned physicians explaining their views on when medical exemptions are appropriately given. That will be followed by a legal panel discussing the legal issues in giving medical exemptions in California. I will be speaking at that panel, and I can tell you that some discussions might be controversial, because at least one of the speakers is blunt and has been highly critical of past VC actions, (but he shall remain nameless).

If you are a California physician and write exemptions or thinking about doing so, you should be at the meeting, period.

Starting at 11:00, the meeting is open to the public. There will be various topics about vaccine safety from some well-known vaccine researchers. A couple of the docs from the morning panel will give their insights to the public about the general requirements California physicians will or should employ in evaluating when a school vaccine exemption should be given. The group’s general counsel will also give his insights about the legal challenges facing the docs and the VC community.

My guess is that this information will help the vaccine concerned public understand what’s required of them to obtain an exemption.

One of the most interesting presentations is likely to be from the founder of MADD (mothers against Drunk Drivers). That’s a pretty impressive grass-roots movement which has had a tremendous positive influence in the country and legislation. My view is that it’s going to take a MADD-like movement to effectuate any real change in the medical, public policy and legislative landscape regarding the safety of vaccines, and to take on Pharma and the medical/public health establishment. So I hope the thought and movement leaders listen carefully to what she has to say. It was a pretty nifty, out-of-the-box idea to invite her. Kudos to Shira Miller and her crew for bringing her to the VC community.

On the merits, I have a strong feeling that there’s going to be presented some new information, at least to the docs, about a powerful new explanation of the connection between vaccines and neurological related conditions, including autism, based on some doctors’ (Diane Powell) and thought leaders (JD Handley) connecting the international research dots. Think microglia/pruning and the brain’s immune system. Who knows, maybe even an attorney might talk about the implication of these concepts as a game changer which cuts across the scientific/policy/legislative and even the medical administrative landscape.

Stay tuned and more after the conference!

Rick Jaffe, Esq.
www.rickjaffe.com

Hey Robert Kennedy Jr: Congrats and here’s a suggested first topic for the vaccine commission: Are aluminum adjuvants in childhood vaccines harming kids?

Hey Robert Kennedy Jr: Congrats and here’s a suggested first topic for the vaccine commission: Are aluminum adjuvants in childhood vaccines harming kids?

Robert: congrats on your appointment as head of Trump’s vaccine study commission. I think the commission is a terrific idea, and there couldn’t be a better choice than you. I’m sure you’re getting a good laugh about how concerned and “alarmed” the pro-vaxxers are at your appointment. They’re trying to calm the true believers by pointing out all that Trump can’t do in terms of changing vaccine policy.

But Robert, there’s one thing you can do, and it will scare the bejesus out of them: shine a light on the growing body of scientific evidence on the dangers of vaccination which is being ignored, suppressed or altered. The thing they fear most is an open and public debate on these issues.And with your new gig, you can definitely shine a lot of light.

Assuming you commission has subpoena power, you’re sure going to enjoy subpoenaing the CDC whistleblower, William Thompson to testify. And for grins, maybe subpoena his boss who decided not to honor your prior subpoena to have Thompson testify in that civil case you filed. Let him put on the record how that decision was made and why.

After the Thompson related scientific fraud and cover-up mess is cleared up, may I respectfully recommend for your consideration a first scientific topic for the Commission: You know that alot of childhood vaccines contain aluminum as an adjuvant, to make the vaccine more potent or reactive. But are they really as safe as the vaccine manufacturers and the FDA say they are? I’m pretty sure you already know the answer to the question, and that your answer is much different from the U.S. Government’s current answer.

To recap the FDA’s public reassurances: “the risk to infants posed by the total aluminum exposure received from the entire recommended series of childhood vaccines over the first year of life is extremely low, according to a study by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).” http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/ScienceResearch/ucm284520.htm.

If that were true, it would be very reassuring.

I think you guys should verify the government’s position, because as you know, there is a growing body of evidence that aluminum is very dangerous to children and adults. Many forward thinking researchers suspect it’s most likely (but certainly not proven) to be a result of defects in the genes and pathways which process heavy metals like aluminum. (Actually, in a criminal case a few years back, I commissioned a white paper which summarized data from two thousand autistic kids and their parents. Lo and behold, the conclusion was just that; some kind of genetic SNP defect/pathway which processes heavy metals was evident in the autistic kids and their tested parent).

Aluminum toxicity is also an issue I’m looking deeply at in the Bob Sears medical board case. I suspect it’s a significant reason why vaccine savvy docs are so concerned about giving so many vaccines to infants and small children over such a short period of time.

You know what’s funny, (or not) or strange, (or not): most of the research on the toxicity of aluminum in vaccines is done outside of the U.S. That’s probably because of the pro-vaxxer’s stranglehold on research, and what some actually think is the manipulation of U.S. research data to hide negative vaccine data. But then you’re about to give the public answers to these questions, big time, especially if you can get the aforedescribed subpoena power.

Just to remind you, the world’s leading authority on the biochemistry of aluminum is Chris Exley in England. He has just co-authored a soon-to-be published article on the Alzheimer’s and aluminum. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0946672X16303777.

He’s also pretty familiar with the aluminum toxicity issue in childhood vaccines and has published his work in another recent article in some journal called Nature, which I think the pro-vaxxers have heard of. http://www.nature.com/articles/srep31578.

Despite the suspicion that there are genetic defects which impair heavy metal processing and excretion in some people, according to Exley, “we have not yet identified and confirmed any specific genetic predisposition which definitely alters the metabolism of aluminum. Perhaps the closest to this that we have is a condition called MMF (macrophagic myofasciitis) which is a condition linked to both aluminum adjuvants and a known genetic mutation.” According to Exley, the guy you have to talk to about MMF is Professor Romain Gherardi, who was the first to recognize the condition. He’s also not in the U.S., but in France.

And for an overview of the research on Vaccines and Autoimmunity of course consult with and bring in Professor Yehuda Shoenfeld from Israel, who as you know recently co-edited the definitive book on the subject called, not surprisingly, Vaccines and Autoimmunity. https://www.amazon.com/Vaccines-Autoimmunity-Yehuda-Shoenfeld/dp/1118663438. But you’ve probably got Yehuda’s number on speed-dial. He’s connected to everyone in the vaccine and autoimmune research field.

Since it’s a government commission, it should be fair and give all sides an opportunity to express their viewpoint. Especially those who believe that every child should receive every single vaccine on the current schedule unless the child meets the specific labeled contraindication, which is basically the pro-vaxxer’s view.

I for one would love to hear Paul Offit testify before your commission and explain his view that all kids could theoretically get 10,000 vaccines without any problems.

I’d also like to hear more about the vaccine makers’ brilliant new marketing idea to create a full vaccination schedule for pregnant women, because sometimes you just can’t get enough of a good thing.

So good luck and Godspeed with this Robert. Time to stir things up in this field, and you be the man to do it.

Rick Jaffe, Esq.
rickjaffeesquire@gmail.com

There is no Cali. mandatory childhood vaccination YET, but it may be coming

There is no Cali. mandatory childhood vaccination YET, but it may be coming

Vaccine concerned (VC) folks decry the recent loss of the personal belief exemption via SB 277, and feel like they’ve been abducted to some kind of communist state. (But hey, ever been to Berkeley!) The present legal reality is that we don’t have mandatory or forced vaccinations here. Rather, vaccines are required for people to engage in certain institutional activities; e.g., kids who want to go to school, or adults who want to work with kids or in health care.

Neither California, nor any other state (that I am aware of) forces a person to be vaccinated. Texas tried to force the HPV/Gardisal vaccination on young girls, but that was shot down.

But alas, we just might get forced childhood vaccination here in California, if I’m reading the tea leaves right. But that would be unconstitutional right? Not necessarily. In fact, the oft-cited original constitutional case on mandatory vaccination, Jacobson v Commonwealth of Mass. http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-supreme-court/197/11.html held that the state can force people to get vaccinated. True, the opinion said so in the context of a public epidemic, but that’s just a detail, and wouldn’t necessarily stop the state from compelling a vaccine program not tied to an actual outbreak, especially given all of the decisions in the last one hundred years which have limited a person’s ability to challenge a state’s pro-vaccination policies.

So let’s say some self-proclaimed well-meaning folks and some big business interests wanted to force every child in a state, say California for example,to get every conceivable vaccine the vaccine manufacturers now or in the future push? How should they do it, hypothetically?

HOW TO FORCE ALL KIDS TO BE VACCINATED IN A FEW (RELATIVELY) EASY STEPS
Step 1
First, if the state has a personal belief exemption, get rid of it.
SB 277: CHECK

Step 2
Even the most rabid pro-vaxxers acknowledge that there have to be some temporary medical exemptions for kids with very serious diseases who are undergoing immunocompromising treatment.

The second step is to limit medical exemptions to the very few contraindications listed on each vaccine’s label and for only the short duration of the labeled contraindication.

Limiting exemptions to labeled contraindications essentially eliminates all blanket medical exemptions from vaccination, because most pro-vaxxers believe there are no medical conditions which justify an exemption from all vaccinations throughout childhood (maybe one, death, but Phama is probably thinking about a workaround for that too).

But the ugly reality for the hypothetical folks who want every child vaccinated is that there are a fair number of VC docs who will probably continue to write medical exemptions. Why? Because under SB 277, a medical exemption which complies with the law is not reversible or reviewable by a school.

So it’s absolutely vital to dissuade the VC docs from writing exemptions.

How? Simple: scare them. How? Two obvious tactics:

First, file charges against a highly visible VC doc CHECK

See my press release on Bob Sears’ cases:

Press Release re Dr. Bob Sears case with Ca. Medical Board

here is my original post on Bob’s case: http://rickjaffeesq.com/2016/09/09/begins-first-accusation-filed-vaccine-exemption-writing-doc/


Second, make a public announcement that docs who issue medical exemptions which don’t meet the “standard of care” (i.e., are not forever contraindicated by the package label of each and every vaccine for which the exemption is sought, will be prosecuted by the board. (And by the way there are no such recognized complete exemptions according to the CDC and AAP).

The Medical Board’s recent announcement. CHECK
(See my last post)

How to force vaccination on the rest?

What about the home schoolers and parents who manage to get a non-standard of care full and indefinite medical exemption from the few and brave VC docs who still write exemptions? So what should the pro-vaxers who want to mandate vaccination for all children do?

Before I tell you, let me give you some legal background on parental rights. I’ve had extensive involvement with one very discrete aspect of parental rights, based on my work with CAM cancer clinics and in particular, a well know Texas clinic that has treated thousands of children with advanced cancer. (See chapters two and three in Galileo’s Lawyer. http://rickjaffeesq.com/

Not to digress, but there are no Christian Scientist children with serious medical conditions

Here’s the short of it: a person can refuse necessary medical treatment for him or herself, but a parent cannot decide to withhold needed medical treatment for a child. Not only is there no parental constitutional right to withhold necessary medical treatment from your own child, if a parent does not allow a child to receive necessary medical treatment for a serious medical condition, the parent’s legal custody will be temporarily terminated, and a guardian will be appointed to make medical decisions on the child’s behalf.

This has happened dozens of times across the country in cancer cases. Most are familiar with the common scenario. A child is diagnosed with advanced cancer, for which there is a supposedly curative or beneficial treatment. The parents refuse because of religious/philosophical reasons or because the parents don’t like the side effects of the recommended treatment and want to go the “natural way.”

After failing to convince the parents, the doctor (most often a chemotherapist) contacts the state child protective services. Eventually the case lands in family court. After a hearing, the parents are ordered to produce their child for treatment, or the parents lose legal custody of their child and a guardian is appointed who makes the decision for the child to undergo the treatment. For young children, under 10 or 12, the courts always order the conventional treatment. My rule of thumb is that if the kid can drive to the hearing, he/she may get to decide. But still, for young children, judges always force the child to receive necessary or potentially life-saving treatment, regardless of the philosophical beliefs or wishes of the parents.

It gets more complicated when the parents want to go with an alternative to conventional treatment and the alternative treatment has some rational basis and/or where there is a semi reputable doctor who can vouch for the alternative treatment. But the point is that not giving treatment to a child who has a serious medical condition where there are treatment options, is not an option a judge will consider.

In short, parental rights, and their opinions and beliefs are largely irrelevant in these kind of family court cases. In other words, parents do not have the right to withhold medical treatment/interventions deemed medically necessary for the health of the child. And there will never be such a right.

Yes, there are cases which talk about constitutionally protected parental rights, especially in the context of visitation rights, meaning a parent’s right to limit a grandparent’s visitation rights. But no case has ever applied a parental right to allow a parent to deny necessary medical care to his/her child.

Notwithstanding all of the above, obviously parents make medical decisions for their children all the time, and obviously their judgment is usually never questioned, except in the rare case of a principled basis refusal to allow conventional or any other needed treatment.

So let’s now go back to a hypothetical plan to mandate vaccinations for all children.

I suppose, you could try a frontal assault, by simply proposing a law requiring all children to be vaccinated according to the AAP and CDC guidelines. But that’s an emotional, hot button issue as the SB 277 battle showed, and it would be very messy. And remember, parents do have some rights and do initially make all medical decisions for their children.

Parental rights, hmmm. But there are a lot of stupid and ignorant people out there, (more than you would think based on recent events) and sometimes parents don’t act in their child’s best interest. Hmmm. What about the rights of the child? And can the rights of the child be in conflict with the decision and rights of the parents? Clearly so, as the cancer chemotherapy cases show.

Step 3: Children have rights too!

So the next step is to obtain legislative acknowledgement that children have rights independent of the rights and responsibilities of their parents. The beauty of this is how do you argue against the rights of children? The key is to create a bunch of general, obvious and innocuous sounding rights that won’t raise a heated fight like SB 277. The bill should create the obvious sounding right that kids are entitled to parents who make decisions in their child’s best interest. Go argue with that.

Equally obvious and seemingly innocuous is a child’s right to have “appropriate” health care. (who decides what is appropriate is the question of course). These are the two sleeper rights needed to effectuate the plan. The play would be to hide these sleeper rights in other even more obvious rights using unassailable buzz words like a “safe environment”, “emotional well-being” “social development.” What kind of jerk would oppose a bill ensuring that children have the tools to optimally develop?

How many rights? More than a few and less than ten. I’m spit-balling here, but seven sounds about right.

A tactical decision: Who should carry the bill? You don’t want to raise unnecessary concerns. It could be anyone, but it shouldn’t be the guy who spearhearded SB 277, Peter Pan or whatever his name was. Anyone but him, if what you want to hide what you’re really doing. But then, maybe a guy like that sees himself as the medical savior of all these poor unvaccinated kids. Anyway, Peter wouldn’t be my pick to lead the fight, if the goal is to pass this bill quietly.

So where are we hypothetically? SB 18 has been recently introduced by none other than Peter Pan aka Dr. Richard Pan, and the bill does it all. http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB18

SB 18: CHECK

Step 4
But how to put some meat on the bare bones of these general, highly laudatory rights, including the right to have parents make correct medical decisions and a child’s rights to have “appropriate medical care”?

The best way would be to have the bill call for research based policy recommendations on these rights to ensure that all children are benefited equally by these rights. Also, say further legislation effectuating these policy recommendations will be forthcoming. These things take time, so give it a relatively long target date, maybe five or half dozen years.

After the bill is passed, create some special blue ribbon committee of recognized experts of the relevant medical specialties and overseeing organizations. Hey, how about the American Association of Pediatrics, the federal Center for Disease Control and the State Department of Health. Completely beyond reproach right?

The panel will have a bunch of meetings, commission reports to make it look as if it is actually investigating the issue. But it’s just windowdressing. The actual results of the panel are already known by the supporters of the bill and the panel members.

I’m going to pull out my crystal ball, go out on a limb and tell you the results of this hypothetical blue ribbon panel, years before the panel is formed or releases its findings: Here they are:
1. Childhood vaccines are thoroughly tested before they are released to the public.
2. Serious side effects from vaccines are extremely rare.
3. Despite the all the hysterical allegations, there is no proven causal connection between any childhood vaccine and any physical or mental disease, or any abnormal childhood developmental condition.
4. The vaccines administered to children per the most recent fully proven vaccine schedule dramatically reduce a child’s likelihood of contracting the disease which is the target of the vaccine.
5. The greater the percentage of children vaccinated, the greater the “herd immulogical” response which protects all vaccinated and unvaccinated children.
6. Based on the foregoing, there is no rational basis for any parent to withhold any childhood vaccine, except for a medically justifiable reason.
7. Medical exemptions from vaccinations should be based solely on a specific vaccine’s contraindications stated on the vaccine’s label or package insert and only for the duration of the medical condition justifying the temporary exemption.
8. Because of the uncontroverted scientific evidence in support of childhood vaccination, all children have the state constitutional right to obtain all vaccines recommended by the AAP and CDC.
9. To effectuate that right and promote the well-being of children, all parents have an obligation to fully vaccinate their children, unless there is a specifically recognized temporary contraindication.
10. The state should use all means at its disposal to enforced the child’s constitutional rights.

The panel members will receive the thanks of a grateful state (and whatever other hypothetical benefits they and their friends may obtain).

So what would happen next?

Here’s what I would do if I was charged with implementing these newly flushed-out rights:

Have local schools pick the heathiest looking vaccine medically exempt students. (An easy task since it’s rumored that unvaccinated kids are actually much healthier than their vaccinated co-students.)

File complaints against the vaccine exemption issuing docs, because there’s never enough pressure than can be put on docs who put their patients at risk of preventable disease and endanger “herd immunity.”

Contact California Child Protective Services and complain about the parents’ medical abuse based on their failure to protect the child’s constitutionally protected health rights. CPS will do a visit, and if that doesn’t work, a proceeding against the parents for violating their child’s state constitution rights to “appropriate medical care,” and forcing them to act in the best interests of their child would be initiated.

Eventually the case will land in the California Supreme Court, but if the issue is framed as a child’s right to necessary medical treatment vs. the parents’ right to withhold such treatment, the VC community won’t like the result.

But that decision won’t be for years, In the interim, there will be some high-profile CPS cases filed, and that surely will have a chilling effect and impact the decisionmaking of parents.

This is all hypothetical, except it isn’t. It’s obviously happening right now. Opposing SB 18 is a good place to begin. Better still, use this bill as a vehicle to reopen the public debate about vaccine safety, efficacy and herd immunity.

My view is that the VC community will never achieve anything by asserting what is viewed as a constitutional right of the few to infect or put at risk the many. Instead, focus on the science, or lack thereof.

Rick Jaffe, Esq.
rickjaffeesquire@gmail.com

Cali. Medical Board makes it official: Docs who write non- standard-of-care medical exemptions will be prosecuted, (but maybe not)

Cali. Medical Board makes it official: Docs who write non- standard-of-care medical exemptions will be prosecuted, (but maybe not)

vaccineimage
The elimination of the PBE (personal belief exemption) via SB 277 has put a lot of pressure on vaccine concerned California pediatricians to write medical exemptions for the children of vaccine concerned parents. The recently dismissed San Diego federal anti-SB 277 lawsuit showed that at least one school board is collecting information about the docs who write these medical exemptions and will forward the information to the medical board for prosecution.

Based on some non-binding legislative history, and some personal discussions with legislators, the vaccine concerned community was hoping that the medical board could not or would not assert jurisdiction over docs who write these exemptions. That seemed completely unrealistic to me based on my experience dealing with medical boards. These guys just don’t give up jurisdiction on their licensees’ conduct.

In case you had any doubts, the board has made it official in its recent executive summary. Here is its position which couldn’t be clearer:
“The passage of two legislative bills increased the Board’s authority to investigate allegations of misconduct. * * *
In addition, SB 277 (Pan and Allen, Chapter 35) effective January 1, 2016, deleted the personal belief exemption from the existing immunization requirements. The Board will investigate any complaints in which a physician may not be following the standard of care in these two new areas.”
(From page 6: http://www.mbc.ca.gov/Publications/Annual_Reports/annual_report_2015-2016.pdf)

So there you have it. It’s basically open season on docs who write full vaccine exemptions, because according the pediatrician groups and the CDC, there are almost no medically justifiable reasons to excuse a child from all childhood vaccinations.

So what can be done about it? In the very short term, nothing really. Many pediatricians will probably be wary of writing medical exemptions.

Still, here are a couple hints. If your child had some prior vaccinations and had a serious adverse event associated with (not necessarily provably caused by) a prior vaccine, you may be able to obtain an exemption from the right doc, which decision would be literature supported. Make sure you bring documentary proof of the prior adverse event(s). The doc will need it for his records. Prior auto immune problems in the child or family members? That might help as well. Again, bring documentation. Help your pediatrician make the case and help him document the exemption. That’s the best protection for you and your doc. Admittedly, right now there is no medical board authority indicating that this would justify or exculpate a doc who writes an exemption on this basis, but I hope to change that within the next six months, in connection with my work on the current medical board case I’m working on, so stay tuned.

Next, an obvious mid-term solution is to amend SB 277 by making medical exemption decisions unreviewable by the medical board. As stated, there is some legislative history indicating that SB 277 was not intended to have the medical board second-guess the decisions of docs who write these medical exemptions. Realistically, passing such an amendment is a long-shot, but it’s time, energy and money better spent that filing another frivolous SB 277 constitutional challenge. (By the way, whatever happened to the dismissed San Diego federal lawsuit which was supposed to be refiled October 1st?) My suggestion: start working your legislators to get some feedback on whether it’s a possibility. If it is, that’s where the community should put its efforts and money.

Finally, there’s a soon-to-be publicly announced group of vaccine concerned docs, which is open to the public. It’s called Physicians for Informed Consent.

Check out their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=physicians%20for%20informed%20consent.

Here is their web site. www.physiciansforinformedconsent.org

These folks have done more good for the vaccine concerned community even before they’ve officially started than all the lawsuits combined, but I can’t talk about that now. Go to their Facebook page, sign up and support them. They have and will continue to make a difference.

Rick Jaffe, Esq.
Rickjaffeesquire@gmail.com

Unwanted advice for the anti-vaxxer Cali. SB 277 lawsuit reboot

Unwanted advice for the anti-vaxxer Cali. SB 277 lawsuit reboot

Here’s what I’m getting from the Bolen Report’s prediction/foreshadowing of the new SB277 challenge, and so here is some more probably unwanted advice:

500 Plaintiffs:

Really? HELLO: you’re fighting an asymmetrical battle. The government has a lot more financial and personnel power than you guys. Moreover, if what you say is true, namely that big pharma is behind the worldwide vaccine conspiracy, pharma has unlimited resources. You’re going to try to manage 500, or even dozens of plaintiffs? That doesn’t make any sense. What’s the upside? You don’t think the judge will know that there are a lot of you vaccine concerned out there? Get real and keep it manageable. Use just a couple plaintiffs to cover your bases, standing wise (a few affected individuals and a couple groups for associational standing), and that’s it.

Multiple Lawsuits:

Really? Filed by the same lawyers? Same or similar legal theories? You’re just making more unnecessary work for yourselves. The same or overlapping defendants will just file consolidation motions in each of the cases, or xerox the dismissal papers and submit them to all the courts. Filing a bunch of similar lawsuits will do a couple things which you shouldn’t want. It will burn a few months and waste money. Plus, you’ll really ingratiate yourselves with the judiciary, because there’s nothing judges like better than wasteful duplicate litigation which clogs their dockets.

Don’t overstate your case by bad-mouthing all vaccines that were ever given since the beginning of time

I get that the hard core anti-vaxxers think that no vaccine has ever helped a single human being or prevented anyone from getting any disease ever, and that everyone involved in the horrific vaccine genocide should be prosecuted, but for God’s sake don’t put that or any other crazy stuff in the complaint. Those Luddite arguments might play well to the hard core anti-vaxxer element, but you guys who are preparing the papers are professionals. There’s no sense writing stuff which will make the judge and the media think the clients and their lawyers are complete wackos.

Don’t make it personal

There is a tendency in cases like this to identify the boogeyman. The prior lawsuit and the two current pending lawsuits did that, focusing on the pediatrician/legislator and some Santa Barbara government official. It’s already been done and it won’t help your case to personally attack people who advocated or worked for a law passed by the legislature. That is how public health policy is set. Nor will it help your case by attacking government officials who want to make sure that the intent of the law is effectuated. That is the job of such officials. Calling them names and vilifying them will surely make the hard-core anti-vaxxers feel good, but it won’t help you case. If anything, it will hurt it.

Acknowledge the deep legal hole you’re in and move forward from there

All of the extreme anti-vaxxers, and a good percentage of the vaccine-concerned are living in an alternative legal universe. In the universe I and all reasonable and informed people live in, for over one hundred years, starting with the Supreme Court’s decision in Jacobson, every single legal decision has upheld the government’s right to mandate vaccination and has rejected a purported individual’s personal belief based asserted right to avoid vaccination based on an proposed extension of a constitutional right. All of these legal challenges fail because as is is oft-stated, the Constitution isn’t a suicide pact.The personal beliefs of the few will never outweigh the public health of the many.

That means that the only conceivable chance to have a judge think about letting the case proceed –rather than grant the state’s motion to dismiss – is to focus on public safety. Specifically, the public safety of kids, particularly young children, and specifically the vaccine schedule and maybe the dangers of the most popular adjuvants. You guys need to drill down, think small and get into the weeds; pick the most unassailable scientific concerns out there and go with that, rather than big picture things like cover-ups, conspiracies and boogeymen.

Your immediate goal

I would respectfully suggest that the purported goal of having some authoritative judge make some grand declaration about an individual’s rights superceding the right of the public to public health is completely unrealistic and will never ever, ever happen. Even a public health argument is a long shot, because such decisions are usually left to the legislative and executive branches. However, if you present a rational and interesting argument, you might just get a judge to let the case go forward, which should be the primary immediate goal of the new lawsuit, as opposed to filing a facially defective complaint –like the prior dismissed lawsuit, or the wacko papers filed in the two pending lawsuits.

In short, try something different this time; be smart; don’t file papers that the extreme anti-vaxxers will love, but the judges and press will think are crazy. That’s been done and done.

Rick Jaffe, Esq.

www.rickjaffe.com
rickjaffeesquire@gmail.com

Press Release re Dr. Bob Sears case with Ca. Medical Board

Press Release re Dr. Bob Sears case with Ca. Medical Board

“I represent Dr. Bob Sears in the California Medical Board’s case against him for writing a medical exemption from vaccination.

We take the board’s accusation seriously. But this case is very clear: this child had two unusual and severe vaccine reactions and his situation warranted a medical exemption. To continue vaccination could have put the child at risk of further harm.

All physicians have an ethical duty to do no harm to a patient. This is no less true when a child suffers serious side effects from any medical intervention.

We anticipate this case will do much to further public education on the importance of recognizing severe vaccine reactions and providing informed consent for medical care. “

Rick Jaffe